Newspaper company founder dies

Started weekly newspapers that focus on community coverage

Richard M. Diamond, founder of The Trumbull Times and The Monroe Courier and other publishing entities, died Dec. 24 at age 86, surrounded by his loved ones. The family said he was the picture of good health and vitality up until the day he died.

The publishing firm founded by Diamond started the Huntington Herald newspaper (now the Shelton Herald) in 1981, after he had sold the company.

Rick Diamond

Rick Diamond

Born in Newark, N.J., on March 24, 1927, to Molly and Herbert (Dick) Diamond, Rick Diamond is survived by his wife of 56 years, Nancy Diamond (nee Schatz); by his three children, Lisa Stein (Mark), Julie Diamond (Caroline) and Michael Diamond (Nina); and by five grandchildren, Max, Sophie, Allie, Vickie, and Nicholas.

After serving in the Navy during World War II, Diamond graduated from Cornell University in 1950. Soon thereafter he begin a career in the newspaper business that spanned 40 years.

He founded the weekly newspaper The Trumbull Times in 1959, and then The Monroe Courier in 1962. His company soon expanded to include a successful printing company, Trumbull Printing.

 

His passion was politics

Diamond’s passion was politics, though, and in 1968 he began to write a weekly political column, “The Connecticut Spotlight,” which was eventually syndicated by 27 — or half — of the daily and weekly newspapers across Connecticut.

Through his column, Diamond broke some important stories and made an impact in state politics.

In 1980, after the sale of the newspaper and printing business to the Milwaukee Journal Co., Diamond and his wife moved to Fort Myers, Fla., to retire.

 

Time with his family

The next 33 years were the happiest of his life as two of his three children and their families relocated as well to southwest Florida and he and his wife witnessed the birth of their five grandchildren.

The Trumbull Times, Monroe Courier, Shelton Herald and other community weekly newspapers and websites in southwestern Connecticut now are owned by Hersam Acorn Newspapers, a family-owned business based in Fairfield County.

 

Involved in the community

Diamond became immersed in southwest Florida politics and community organizations. Never having lost his love for the newspaper business, he became a frequent contributor to the Fort Myers News-Press as a guest columnist, addressing a host of national and local issues that he argued passionately for.

Diamond also was president of the Lee County chapter of Habitat for Humanity, was active in the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte counties, and was past chairman of the Lee Charter Commission, appointed by the Board of County Commissioners.

 

Services were in Florida

Funeral services were set for Dec. 26 at Temple Beth El, 16225 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, with burial to follow in Fort Myers Memorial Gardens Cemetery.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by Fort Myers Memorial Gardens Funeral Home, 1589 Colonial Blvd., Fort Myers, Fla.

Online condolences may be made to the family at www.fortmyersmemorial.com.

 

 

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