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While most Shelton bear sightings in recent days have been in the Old Stratford Road and Long Hill Cross Road areas, near the city’s eastern border, other sightings have been reported in a part of the Huntington neighborhood, in the western part of the city.

Are there two different bears?

“I think we have two bears in Shelton,” said Teresa Gallagher, the city’s conservation agent.
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Click below to see recent photos of a bear in Shelton:
http://www.sheltonherald.com/68091/photos-bear-spotted-again-on-wednesday-and-thursday-in-shelton/
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There’s no doubt a bear has been traversing areas near Route 8 in the southeastern part of the city in recent days, with multiple sightings — including by Shelton police officers and state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) officials — in that part of town.

This includes on Daybreak Lane, a road off Old Stratford Road, and Long Hill Cross Road.

But is there another bear in the area of Waverly Road and Adams Drive, which is about three miles west of the other locations?

The separate sightings have occurred somewhat close in time to each other, and there are many main roads between the locations, so it’s unlikely the same bear has been traveling between these locations.


Adams Drive sighting Tuesday


An Adams Drive resident reported seeing a bear at about 5 a.m. on Tuesday, May 5, and contacted Shelton police about an hour later, according to the police.

The local police and state DEEP officials responded but couldn’t find the bear, which is not unusual.

The resident said they were told another bear sighting had been reported on Waverly Road and Tower Lane, which is about half of a mile from Adams Drive in the same general section of Huntington.
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Bear gets close to Shelton daycare center on Thursday morning; click below to get details:
http://www.sheltonherald.com/68118/update-bear-was-near-daycare-center-in-shelton-this-morning
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http://www.sheltonherald.com/68137/shelton-daycare-center-owner-on-bear-sighting-nearby-we-were-told-to-take-precautions
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Gallagher said the Adams Drive resident was certain of what they saw on Tuesday early morning, telling her an adult family member “got a good look at the bear and it was most definitely a bear, not a dog or something else.”

This part of Shelton is more rural, with lots of open space and reservoir land, including the Isinglass Reservoir (also known as the Far Mill Reservoir).

“The most likely explanation is that this is a second young male bear passing through,” Gallagher said.


Usually just passing through


Gallagher noted that bears usually are just traveling through Shelton, so it’s possible the bear seen in the Waverly Road/Adams Drive/Tower Lane area may be elsewhere by now.

The bear observed on Daybreak Lane in recent days has a visible gash in its rear, so that physical characteristic might help officials conclude whether there’s been one bear or two bears in Shelton.

A bear was first seen in Shelton on April 30, with sightings that day — listed in chronological order — on:

— Brownson Drive (off Soundview Avenue, close to the Huntington Green and Brownson Country Club)

— Wesley Drive (near Buddington Road and Huntington Street)

— Mill Street (close to Bridgeport Avenue)

— Long Hill Cross Road (near Bridgeport Avenue and Route 8)

— Old Stratford Road (Center at Split Rock, close to Bridgeport Avenue and Route 8)

The next reported sighting appears to have been on Monday, May 4 on Daybreak Lane in the evening.


Bear sighting map


Click below to view the Shelton Conservation Commission map of recent bear sightings (please be patient, it takes a few seconds for the sighting icons to appear on the map):

www.google.com/maps/@41.2776926,-73.1386502,13z/data=!4m2!6m1!1szFhJb6Rzm3q8.kb2QwhR_Mf9M?hl=en


How to report a bear sighting


Anyone who observes a bear can fill out an online form to be submitted to the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection; click below for the form:

www.depdata.ct.gov/wildlife/sighting/bearrpt.htm