Assessor: Some Shelton homeowners saw tax hike, but few complained

Photo of Brian Gioiele
Mayor Mark Lauretti and developer Robert Scinto stand for the Pledge of Allegiance during a Flag Day lunch and ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park, in Shelton, Conn. June 10, 2022.

Mayor Mark Lauretti and developer Robert Scinto stand for the Pledge of Allegiance during a Flag Day lunch and ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park, in Shelton, Conn. June 10, 2022.

Ned Gerard / Hearst Connecticut Media

SHELTON — As tax payments come into city coffers, Tax Assessor William Gaffney said the collection has come without much complaint, despite a property revaluation that saw most homeowners’ property values jump.

The city’s 2022-23 budget came with a 17.47 mill rate, or more than 4.5 mills less than last year. But the revaluation meant that some people got a tax increase despite the lower rate.

“There was a 26 percent increase across the board,” Gaffney said about the results of the revaluation on the local property values.

As far as the tax bills in people’s mailboxes this month, Gaffney said, “Some are up, some are down, some stayed the same. But we have not had many complaints at all about the adjustments.”

“If people’s taxes have jumped significantly, it’s because their values have increased significantly. That’s what reevaluation does,” Mayor Mark Lauretti said. “It’s a mixed bag. Some people's taxes have gone down.

“Let’s not forget that our taxes have not increased in 10 years and in some cases have gone down,” Lauretti added. “Our mill rate is 17.4 and going down. People in Shelton will continue to be the recipient of low and stable declining taxes. I'm not sure anybody else can say that.”

Gaffney said after the revaluation numbers were released to residents, there were only about 100 appeals out of about 15,000 parcels. He said there have also been more than three dozen commercial landowners who have appealed the revaluation in court.

Gaffney said while taxes may be up for some, that has not changed interest in the city, which boasts such a low mill rate.

“We are consistently affordable,” Lauretti said about why Shelton remains a destination for people and businesses. “Our taxes are half as much as surrounding communities in most places in the state.”

Lauretti also noted that Shelton boasts a large volunteer fire department and garbage collection as benefits, as many other communities must pay additionally beyond their taxes for such services.

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