State Rep. Jason Perillo was named as one of four legislators to sit on the Committee on Contested Elections, which has not met since 1985 but now will meet to review the contested election in the 120th district in Stratford.

A race between Democrat Phil Young and Republican Jim Feehan is now under review by the Committee on Contested Elections. The race for state representative in the 120th district was decided by only 13 votes, with Young winning the plurality.

According to the Stratford Registrar of Voters, though, 76 voters in Stratford’s ninth voting district were issued the wrong ballots. Instead of receiving ballots permitting a vote for Feehan or Young in the 120th district, these voters were issued ballots with the names of the candidates running for state representative in the 122nd district, Ben McGorty and Jose Goncalves.

Due to the slim margin — and the fact that 76 voters were denied the right to cast their ballot in the race — Feehan brought the issue to the Superior Court last month.

The case made its way to the Supreme Court where the Justices determined that they did not have jurisdiction in the matter. Instead, the Supreme Court referred the contested election to the House of Representatives. House Rules allow for the creation of a Committee on Contested Elections to handle such cases. The committee was last convened in 1985 when an election for state representative in Waterbury was contested.

“I’m proud that the legislature has confidence in my judgement and expertise on the matter,” said Perillo. "It's an honor to be on this committee and review the contested election before us. Our goal should be to make sure everyone who voted had their vote counted. If voters didn't have their vote counted for their state representative, a new election would be appropriate."

The committee, which consists of two Republicans and two Democrats, will have to review and make a recommendation to the General Assembly by Feb. 4.