Shelton schools still need teachers and paras, officials say

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Shelton has hired 23 teachers, two board certified behavior analysts, and two principals, leaving nine vacancies, including in math and special education.

Shelton has hired 23 teachers, two board certified behavior analysts, and two principals, leaving nine vacancies, including in math and special education.

Ned Gerard / Hearst Connecticut Media

SHELTON — Interviews continue as the school district looks to fill all its vacancies before school opens on Sept. 6.

Schools Chief of Staff Carole Pannozzo said the district has avoided staff shortages experienced by so many other districts throughout the state this summer. Overall, Pannozzo said Shelton has hired 23 teachers, two board certified behavior analysts, and two principals.

There remain nine openings, Pannozzo said. The district needs three teachers — two special education and one for math — as well as five paraprofessionals and one nurse.

“Interviews are scheduled for this week and will be ongoing until our positions are filled,” she said. “Although the teacher candidate pool is shrinking, Shelton offers good salaries and benefits, well-kept and attractive facilities and progressive leadership which makes Shelton a great place to work.”

Pannozzo said math and special education remain a spot of need — same as most other districts in the state, meaning competition for the spaces is intense.

“If we are unable to hire for the remaining positions, we may ask staff to teach an additional period for additional pay,” Pannozzo added.

The district filled one of its major openings last week with the hiring of John Coppola, a veteran of the Ansonia school system, for Mohegan School principal. This principal hire came weeks after the district filled the Perry Hill School’s top job with Donato Piselli.

Piselli earns $170,886, and Coppola will earn $162,385.

The two board certified behavior analysts, according to Pannozzo, will assist teachers and other staff with student behavioral issues that affect classroom instruction.

“The positions are part of the district's response to students' social-emotional issues,” said Pannozzo, adding that some issues are a result of the pandemic.

brian.gioiele@hearstmediact.com