Letter: Beaver dam destruction an embarrassment

Below is a Letter to the Editor from this week's Shelton Herald. If you'd like to have a letter to the editor run next week, email letters to brian.gioiele@hearstmediact.com

Below is a Letter to the Editor from this week's Shelton Herald. If you'd like to have a letter to the editor run next week, email letters to brian.gioiele@hearstmediact.com

Contributed photo

To the Editor:

The destruction of the beaver dam is bothersome. Just because someone thinks that their neighbor’s property is not pleasing does not make it ok to alter or destroy it, whether it is a private residence or city property. It is terrible to think that someone in the Shelton community would take matters into their own hands just because they don’t like a neighbor’s property or have issues with it.

In this case, city-owned conservation space is the neighbor. Nature is unpredictable and expectations cannot be placed on it to look or act a specific way. At Boehm Pond, beavers created a habitat that could been classified as swampy. The swampy area benefited other wildlife. For example, Wood Ducks were nesting inside decaying trees, Painted Turtles basked in the sun on the fallen trees, Snapping Turtles swam in the algae, and Green Herons and Great Blue Herons hunted for fish while hiding in the vegetation.

The pond may not have been traditionally beautiful, but its beauty rested in the fact that homes, food, and hiding places were provided. The conservation space was thriving in its own instinctive way.

The size of the pond grew over the past few years because of the beaver dam. As city officials have stated, the pond was entirely on city conservation space. If anyone had an issue with encroachment on private property or the road, the issue should have been taken up with the city.

The beavers were living in the pond in the weeks prior to the destruction. I saw them. They were gone after the damage. I have a hard time believing that animals would willingly vacate their shelter, familiar food sources and territory right before winter settles in. I fear the worst for the beavers.

No one in that neighborhood purchased property out of hardship or lack of finding housing elsewhere. It was a choice. When purchasing a home or land, mindful thought should be placed on many things which should include the bordering property. Consideration should be made regarding the land management, potential management, and zoning of any bordering property. If the nature and any aspects of nature are an irritation, it is a questionable decision to purchase property next to or near conservation space.

The conservation space damage is an embarrassment to Shelton. It is sad that any issues that might have existed were not handled better. I hope that someone steps forward with information to prevent this type of event from happening again. 

Lisa Adriani

Shelton